“Social” Groups in Enterprise Social Networks

In this final article in our series on Enterprise Social Group types, we address the so-called “non-work” groups. One of the greatest fears we hear from Internal Communications Managers on launching their brand new Enterprise Social Networking (ESN) platform is that staff will only use it for frivolous “non-work” communications. When SWOOP conducted one of its very first group benchmarking studies for a large corporate client with more than 50,000 staff, the greatest fear was that the “Joke Sharing” group would come out on top (it didn’t).   Often the fear of what senior executives might think about supposedly “non-work” groups making use of company…

Connection In Isolation

Down in Invercargill, the southernmost city in New Zealand and one of the most isolated in the world, there are three employees running a busy car rental branch. Rarely do they work together as a team. Mostly it’s a passing update and a quick “hello” during a shift changeover. Yet, these three workers are some of the best-connected employees in their multi-national company of thousands. Each day, the team at Thrifty Car Rental in Invercargill stay connected with what’s happening at every other Thrifty branch across NZ through their Enterprise Social Network (ESN). If there’s a new Thrifty employee up…

Data-Driven Collaboration Part 1: How Rich Data Can Improve Your Communication

Originally published on Carpool. This is the first of a series, coauthored by Laurence Lock Lee of Swoop Analytics and Chris Slemp of Carpool Agency, in which we will explain how you can use rich, people-focused data to enhance communication, increase collaboration, and develop a more efficient and productive workforce. It’s safe to say that every enterprise hungers for new and better ways of working. It’s even safer to say that the path to those new and better ways is often a struggle. Many who struggle do so because they are starting from a weak foundation. Some are simply following…

Are we Getting Closer to True Knowledge Sharing Systems?

First generation knowledge management (KM) systems were essentially re-labelled content stores. Labelling such content as ‘knowledge’ did much to discredit the whole Knowledge Management movement of the 1990s. During this time, I commonly referred to knowledge management systems as needing to comprise both “collections and connections”, but we had forgotten about the “connections”.  This shortcoming was addressed with the advent of Enterprise Social Networking (ESN) systems like Yammer, Jive, IBM Connect and now Workplace from Facebook. So now we do have both collections and connections. But do we now have true knowledge sharing? Who do we Rely on for Knowledge…